A special day

WP_20160202_003Today is a special day in our house.

It is Saturday.  A day to relax, to sleep in and for me to make pancakes for breakfast. I’m planning on mowing the lawns and sitting down afterwards in our newly created seating area to enjoy a cold beer.  Who knows, we might even go over to the in-laws and help build a mai mai.

A pretty normal Saturday really.  “There is nothing special in all that.”  I hear you say.

To some people it would be an incredible day.  The horsemen of the Apocalypse, War, Pestilence, Famine, Death and George see to that.  For the record, George is the newest horseman and his job is to tie extension cords in knots when you aren’t looking.  He also has a side hobby of wrapping garden hoses around lawn mowers.  Even the other Four don’t like him.

To the 2.5 million people around our planet that, like me, have MS it could also be seen as a great day.

Fatigue, pain, stigma, destruction and depression are the five horsemen of MS.  I know that while I mow my lawns I will be fatigued, it will hurt, I will worry that my wife is worrying about me overdoing it, the destruction to some of my nerves will still be there and I will wish I didn’t have MS.

So what makes today so special then?  It is my 6th anniversary of having MS.  That’s right. 6 years ago today I woke up with double vision and a very munted sense of balance.  Not a great way to start a day that included photographing a wedding.  But, like every day since, I got through the day with the amazing support of family and friends.

After 6 years of living with MS even I am surprised at how well I deal with it.

Looking back I have achieved so many things I don’t believe I would have, had it not been for the MS.

For a start you would not be reading this and my posts wouldn’t have been read all around the world.  I don’t think I would have ever written and chosen to self-publish ‘Blue Ted’s Day at Home’.

We would not be in the home we have with the wonderful lifestyle we enjoy.

And I’m pretty confident that I would not have recently played lawn bowls for my community.  That’s right! I have handed in my ‘young person card’ and have taken up lawn bowls.

I don’t think I would be doing the job I do.  Working with a fantastic bunch of people makes it so much easier to keep going, even on the days when I am a ‘bit grumpy’. They are all so incredibly supportive.  Considering that the average time for someone who is working after diagnosis is 4 years, I’m punching above my weight.

The last 6 years have taught me to appreciate the good days, accept the bad ones and most importantly to tell those I love how much they mean to me every single day.

Most importantly it has taught me that yes, I have MS but it does NOT have me.

If I can live with MS I’m sure I can work out how to deal with George……